Given we’re only a few weeks from the release of my most anticipated blockbuster of the year, this is a great opportunity to get reacquainted with Ethan Hunt and his team.

Mission: Impossible Fallout hits cinemas everywhere August 2nd.

- Stu































Billy and Christof are back! In this episode they cover Ant-Man & The Wasp, while getting freaked out by an actual, real life wasp that had flown into the recording studio!

Also they spend a good 10 minutes up-top talking about Big Dick Energy because y’know, priorities.

Topics include: Sweet Zaddy Rudd, the increase of better MCU Villains, is this the funniest film int he MCU?, and of course Big Dick Energy in the MCU.


As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here


If you want to engage with Billy and Christof more you can do so at the following: 

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/

Christof
Twitter - https://twitter.com/weeklygeek


Our Intro and Outro music provided by bensound.com




Thanks to the awesome people at STUDIOCANAL we’re giving you the chance to win 1 of 10 double in-season passes to Toni Collette's latest film Hereditary, which is freaking out audiences worldwide. For your chance to win, simply head over to our Facebook page here and find the Hereditary post for details to go in the draw. Couldn’t be simpler!

This film tells the story of the Graham family and the secrets that hide in the depths of their complex relationships. Mysteriously captivating, psychologically thrilling, and paranormally charged, Hereditary proves that family is inescapable.

Hereditary hits cinemas Australia wide on June 7th, 2018.

For those who missed the Japanese Film Festival (JFF) earlier this year, you're in luck. Because an off-season program called JFF Fringe, which will feature four contemporary Japanese films has just been announced. The films will be screened once only over the period of May 30 - August 29, 2018 at Sydney's Event Cinemas George St and Event Cinemas Brisbane City Myer Centre.

Tickets are $15 each and are on sale at participating cinemas' box offices and online.

For further details head over to www.japanesefilmfestival.net/jff-fringe-2018

Screening Schedule:

May 30 - Gintama
Lightening the mood is the live-action gag-comedy Gintama, set in an alternate universe where feudal Japan is occupied by aliens.

June 27 - Honnouji Hotel
Present meets past in the Australian premiere of Honnouji Hotel, an entertaining period film with a fantasy twist.

The beautifully hand-drawn animation In This Corner of the World is a realistic and moving film that won the Japan Academy Prize 2017 for Best Animation.

August 29 - The Long Excuse
A sold-out film at JFF 2016, The Long Excuse is an introspective family drama exploring realistic human connections.

- Stu 




This is it! The moment we’ve all been waiting for.

Strap yourselves in, because like Infinity War, we’re going long!

Topics discussed include: Comic Book Event films, 10 years of universe story building paying off?, Christof’s bladder humblebrag, Starlord’s kind of a dick, Dr Strange is finally allowed to do Magic, Infinity War MVP's, and Can I have your arm?

As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here


If you want to engage with Billy and Christof more you can do so at the following: 

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/

Christof
Twitter - https://twitter.com/weeklygeek


Our Intro and Outro music provided by bensound.com





Netflix’s new science fiction extravaganza Lost In Space has been out since April 13, plenty of time for fans to binge the ten-part series.

And what they found alongside the updated adventures of the space family Robinson was a lot of surprises for those who remember the original 1960s series.

Here’s ten nods to the past hidden away by Netflix:




WARNING: DANGER LOST IN SPACE FANS! MULTIPLE SPOILERS AHEAD!



1: The series theme song. Listen closely and a few seconds into the credits theme the music subtly warps into the original’s (second) theme tune, written by Star Wars composer John Williams.

2: Bill Mumy pops up. Mumy, the original Will Robinson, appears in the opening episode as the real Dr Smith, laying injured in a corridor, a victim of the attack on The Resolute and uttering just one line before his identity is stolen by…

3: June Harris (played by Parker Posey), a murderous criminal desperate to escape Earth. Her character’s name is a clear nod to the original Dr Smith actor, Jonothan Harris.

4: Tam Soderquist. Spotted briefly as mechanic Don West’s partner. Tam takes her name from one of the two Robinson children in the Space Family Robinson comic book series which inspired the first series (Tam) and the actor who played the first Judy Robinson, Marta Kristen who was adopted as a child and renamed Martha Soderquist.

5: The ice planet. The new Lost In Space credits say it is based on “Lost In Space: No Place To Hide”, the 1960s series (unaired) pilot where the family crashes on an ice planet and face freezing to death… sound familiar?

6: Obviously when The Robot says “Danger, Will Robinson” he’s repeating the original Robot (named B9)’s best-known catch-cry. But keep an ear out for when Vijay (another survivor) is chatting with Penny. She asks him a question and he replies “Affirmative”. Netflix have confirmed that yep, that’s another rebooted Robotism.

7. While we’re on The Robot, keep an eye on the shelves in Will Robinson’s room. Sitting there amongst his toys is a small wind-up toy that looks a lot like B9.

8. Don West’s pet chicken is named Debbie. In the original series The Robinsons rescued a space monkey with pointy ears from the planet Priplanus who said “Bloop! Bloop!”. They named it Debbie.

9: The injured astronaut rescued by Don and Dr Smith (aka June) is named Angela Goddard. The original Penny Robinson was played by Angela Cartwright and the original Don West by Mark Goddard.

10: That scene at the end where Will has to float, untethered into space to fix a jammed door on the Jupiter 2? Yes, that was “inspired”, Netflix has confirmed, by a very similar scene from the 1960’s pilot.

And a bonus Easter Egg not from the original series but from real life. The moment Don West was blinded by anti-fogging agent in his helmet is VERY similar to an incident faced by Canadian Space Agency astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield when a drop of helmet anti-fog mixture hit his eye while he was orbiting earth.

Here’s Commander Hadfield describing the experience:




- Scott

If you want to engage with Scott you can do so at the following:
Twitter - https://twitter.com/blahblahellis













With the imminent approach of Avengers: Infinity War it's time for Billy and Christof to Ragnarok and Roll with Thor: Ragnarok

We also do a recap of Black Panther, and get a sense of the MCU and the Infinity Stones in "Previously, in the MCU".

Topics discussed include: Odin's baggage dumped on Thor & Loki, Is this the Best Thor film yet?, HULK EXPERIENCE PERSONALITY GROWTH, Cosmic Visuals, Badass Valkyrie, Numerous Easter Eggs, Our Top 10 and Bottom 3 MCU films, and Hulk’s dick (yet again).

As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here


If you want to engage with Billy and Christof more you can do so at the following: 

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/

Christof
Twitter - https://twitter.com/weeklygeek


Our Intro and Outro music provided by bensound.com




As comedies go, I Feel Pretty is the blandest of vanilla ice creams. A painfully generic story is hampered by a scrambled message which never quite landed for me. The film bombards you with a multitude of cliches that you’d expect from a “body swap/you’re now magically special” trope that's been exhaustingly overused.

Amy Schumer plays Renee Bennett, a woman who’s struggling with insecurity in relation to her body image. In an act of desperation, she wishes she was "truly beautiful" and courtesy of a bump on the head at her gym, her wish is granted. Renee wakes and only sees a new and beautiful self in the mirror. Enter moral premise stage left: nothing in her life actually changes. Genius! Renee’s life doesn't magically change even though she now plays up the "hot chick" status; to everyone else she’s just plain old Renee.

My biggest issue with this film is that it’s set in and around the world of fashion and cosmetics. Renee works for Avery LeClaire, a high end makeup company attempting to launch an affordable range of products. With the bulk of the film set in the company head office, the cast is populated by glamourous statuesque waifs. For a film touting the underlying message that true beauty comes from within, the film certainly seemed to enjoy parading a plethora of half-dressed, highly manicured women. Now they may be poking fun at these industries, but it shows that the Hollywood is still interested in populating its product with the stereotypically good looking folk, a problem that American cinema seems to compulsively succumb far more frequently than the realism of actors in European or British cinema, for example. Add to that some suspicious product placement and overall, despite its best efforts, I Feel Pretty felt ingenuine and at odds with its intended moral overtone.

I Feel Pretty is a forgettable experience which I can’t say is worth getting out to see. Maybe best to wait till you stumble across it on Netflix one night after you’ve had a few. Maybe then the jokes will actually, well ... come across as jokes.

If you see the film and agree or disagree with my thoughts feel free to drop a line below.

I Feel Pretty is cinemas from today.

5/10

- Ali






This week it’s what nobody asked for but what turned out to actually be pretty good: Spider-Man Homecoming! 

Speaking of things nobody asked for, this week we are joined by Ben, George, and Connor from The Podcast Strikes Back! Seriously though, this episode was a boatload of fun.

Topics discussed include: Spider-Man Film Rankings, Too many Easter Eggs, Captain America’s community announcements, and the movie Game Night for some reason...

As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here


If you want to engage with Billy and Christof more you can do so at the following: 

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/

Christof
Twitter - https://twitter.com/weeklygeek


Our Intro and Outro music provided by bensound.com



The more I think on it, the more I realise I enjoyed Yakuza 0 more than I thought I did. The colourful, quirky combination of sandbox gameplay, beat-em-ups and karaoke - the latter only one amongst the game's host of other noteworthy minigames - was jarring for someone bred on the immediate, easy thuggishness of GTA and Saint's Row, but grew on me more in retrospect.

So it made me all the more excited for Yakuza 6; now that I had a foot in the door, I was keen to explore the franchise in general. Trouble is, its sixth numbered entry happens to be the end of the line. Curse my poor timing.


While it may not be the end of the franchise, given its array of colourful characters with plots yet untapped, Yakuza 6 draws a line under the tale of lead protagonist Kazuma Kiryu. In the wake of his near-death experience at the end of Yakuza 5 (which, full disclosure, I haven't played), Kiryu winds up in hospital to recover before being thrown into prison for what seems to be the five hundredth time. Upon getting out three years later, he finds that Haruka, the closest thing he has to a daughter and one of the mainstays of the orphanage he runs, has not only been hospitalised under suspicious circumstances following a hit-and-run, but has given birth to a son, Haruto. To make matters worse, the Yomei Alliance - a criminal group whom even Kiryu's own Tojo Clan are hesitant to fight - are after Haruto. With little left to lose, Kiryu must protect Haruto, discover the identity of the child's father, and uncover the reasons behind the Yomei Alliance's involvement.


So if you couldn't tell from the above paragraph, there's quite a bit of story going on, giving the finale of Kiryu's story a sense of scope both far-reaching and deeply personal. In addition to the old stomping grounds of Kamurocho in Tokyo, Kiryu also travels to the new district of Onomichi Jingaicho in Hiroshima, giving the game some more variety in locale, visual design and sidequests. The streets are densely packed with things to do and no shortage of mooks to massacre with Kiryu's brutal fighting moves.

To be honest, reviewing Yakuza 6 on its own, it's a damn fine game. The combat feels much smoother and the transition between overworld and battles is much neater than in Yakuza 0. Both districts are also replete with the requisite minigames and sidequests, including at least one turn for Kiryu in a fruit mascot costume. Graphical enhancements make the most of the PS4 hardware; this is a gorgeous game to look at, and even the cutscenes have been developed with what looks like more photorealistic panache. While the backstory was confusing at times for someone like me, only barely familiar with the series' history through a game that technically serves as a prequel, the game's narrative is a reasonably smooth entry for newbies; I found it pretty enjoyable, becoming emotionally invested in Kiryu's struggle. This is also despite the overwhelming amount of time the game yanks control from you in order to play out a lengthy story cutscene, of which the game has many (some might say, too many).


But to hear some long-running players tell it, the game does an overall disservice to its legacy. Though there are many long-term returning characters - most of whom's personalities and relationships to Kiryu are summarised in a handy dream sequence at the game's start - most of them don't show up for long. Rather than previous games' multiple playable protagonists, here Kiryu is the only one we get to play with directly. And as a grand finale to a story that's been running since the first game hit the PS2 in 2005, many long-term fans are calling the ending comparatively disappointing to all that's come before; still good, but not quite the capstone watermark they were hoping for.


I may not be the best judge of Yakuza 6 as the concluding chapter of this epic saga, though it definitely compares favourably to the good times I had with Yakuza 0. I can safely say, though, that I had a ball with it. There's enough for the game to stand on its own feet and rope newcomers in to the wild world of the Japanese mafia, with a strong story beautifully realised in graphics and gameplay. Whether it's a good full stop on the franchise thus far is for veterans to decide, but I'd imagine the most devout Yakuza fans will still find more than enough to be recommended on.

- Chris


Yakuza 6 is available on Playstation 4 now.

Review copy kindly supplied to Geek of Oz by Five Star Games.