Since everyone seemed to enjoy last year's write-up, here's my (admittedly belated) take on the 10 best things you should've read in 2017! If you did check any of these out, give yourself a cookie.

Please keep in mind, due to work/family/travel/getting married/having a honeymoon/sleeping where possible over the past year, there are a number of great books and comics I didn't get a chance to check out; this list is spun off from the fruits of my 2017 Goodreads labours only. Please don't hate me for not including The Language of Thorns or Secret Empire. (but really, is that last one going to make anyone's lists for anything celebratory?)

---


10. Slugfest: Inside the Epic, 50-Year Battle between Marvel and DC

Though it lacks in flair at times, Reed Tucker delivers an insightful and rigorously researched look at the animosity between the Big Two of superhero comics. The historical narratives Tucker pens are fascinating, though the work occasionally veers into dry, lecture-like territory (ironic, considering my day job).

Comics can be both an exhilirating career path and a cruel, nasty business. Seeing inside the half-century war between the biggest names in the business sharpens both those perspectives, at times giving us the heights of passionate joy shared between rivals as well as the darkest, unvarnished moments that make Marvel and DC look almost like rival street gangs. One for the comics history buffs.

---


9. Kill or Be Killed, Volume 1

My biggest reading sin for 2017 was not checking out enough indy stuff; comics, fantasy novels and the odd non-fiction book made up most of my reading list. The indy stuff I did check out, though, works like gangbusters.

The latest crime comic from the super team of writer Ed Brubaker and artist Sean Phillips, Kill or Be Killed is a nastier, grittier take on Average-Joe-vigilante-fun-times - think Kick-Ass but minus the spandex and pushed through a grimier filter. The protagonist is a compelling, sympathetic yet selfish jerkass, the violence is unflinchingly depicted by Phillips's able pencils, and the unique selling point of the vigilantism this time round is, without spoiling, pretty intriguing. The book has a finger on the pulse of current social and cultural attitudes to politics and violence, making it both terrific and timely.

---


8. Superman: Son of Superman

Honestly, this book and its successive volumes are just fun. Superman's back, he has a cute son now, and he's teaching him how to use his powers. It's a lighter take on the father-son dynamic that powerful writer-artist duo Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason honed to a T in their Batman and Robin run, with just the right balance of heart and heroic battles. Son of Superman doesn't necessarily break new ground for the genre, but it's definitely got a lot of spirit.

---


7. A Court of Wings and Ruin

Despite being loaded with enough verbal chaff to stuff a reasonably-sized garbage bag, the conclusion to Sarah J. Maas's acclaimed A Court of Thorns and Roses saga still packs a punch when the good stuff happens. The final battle between the Night Court and the enemies of Prythian is pretty epic, but you definitely have to wade through a lot of exposition and no small amount of plot filler to get there.

Though the book doesn't reach the emotional heights scaled masterfully by its predecessor, A Court of Mist and Fury, the moments it turns on are pretty impactful, and it's still a great rounding off of the main story before we get to the spinoffs. As always, Kleenex should be handy.

---


6. Wonder Woman: Year One

Greg Rucka and his alternating teams of artists are killing it on Wonder Woman right now, but no volume of the run thus far had me as into it as Year One. With sterling art from Australian Nicola Scott, Diana Prince's introduction to the world of humanity is funny, heartwarming, action-packed and beautifully rendered. Rucka's writing has a keen talent for at once highlighting and dispelling the "otherness" of Diana, finding a very human core that a lot of past writers have either sidestepped or missed completely.

It's also a timely installment given the success of Gal Gadot's kickass turn on the big screen earlier in 2017. Anyone who dug that should definitely give Rucka's run a read.

---


5. Tom King's Batman (I Am Gotham, I Am Suicide, I Am Bane)

I'm still not sure why a lot of folks are down on it - to the point that I wrote a review on my own website about it (shameless self-promotion!) - but I'm loving Tom King's run on Batman to bits. After regaining his memories and returning to protect Gotham at the end of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's celebrated run, King's incarnation of Batman has never been broodier, while simultaneously being emotionally raw. A death wish and a new pair of superheroes are causing Batman to rethink his campaign on crime, and that's before even getting into what ends up happening with Catwoman.

Though artist David Finch still draws far too many throbbing veins when he pencils Batman on the page, the story is pretty excellent. Given the amount of character brooding, though, you may want a volume of something like and fluffy to read after.

---


4. Red Sister

What if Harry Potter was a girl, in a full-on fantasy world that might also be in the future, and she was learning to be a magical assassin in an all-girl assassin convent?

Until now, I've been lukewarm on Mark Lawrence - he of the difficult read Prince of Thorns - but with Red Sister, he really knocks it out of the park. Nona is an immediately gripping protagonist, and the well-worn tropes associated with the fantasy-setting-as-educational-institution are used to great effect. I don't want to say too much about it, but I will say you should definitely put this on the read list before its sequel, Grey Sister, hits shelves in April this year.

---


3. Saga, Volume 7

What more is there to say about Saga at this point? Writer Brian K. Vaughan and artist Fiona Staples continue belting it out at full-force with their epic, romantic odyssey across the stars. Alana and Marko are still doing their thing, and their child Hazel - our narrator in the future - is now able to speak with all the sass of her parents.

As well as being a great book in its own right, Volume 7 recaptures some of the narrative momentum lost between Volumes 5 and 6. Granted, any volume of Saga still stands a head and a foot above the competition, but it's good to know we're fully back on track for this bullet train of a story.

---


2. The Stone Sky

Writer N.K. Jemisin's works have never been easy things to read, but they're always compelling. Her landmark Broken Earth trilogy, beginning with The Fifth Season and continuing through The Obelisk Gate, dealt with abuse, child murdering, depression, sexism, slavery and the end of the world. As the finale to this great work, The Stone Sky is an awesome, heady, dense and often emotionally compromising work, tying all the threads together and bringing mother Essun and her daughter Nassun's goals ever closer to each other.

There's nothing quite like the Broken Earth trilogy, and you really should be reading The Fifth Season anyway, but rest assured that the trilogy does end up with an exceptionally great finale. Now let's cross our fingers that Jemisin can win her third Hugo Award for this one.

---


1. Oathbringer

If you're a longtime reader on this site, you had to know this would be here. I feel like I've run out of all the good things to say about the Stormlight Archive, and Oathbringer is just more of those good things piled on top.

As well as producing what may be the longest fictional work since War and Peace, Brandon Sanderson ups the ante for both his own series and epic fantasy in general, delivering a masterstroke of a novel packed with adventure, politics, romance, humour, despair and triumph, all set against a backdrop of slice-of-life storytelling. Never has an apocalyptic battle between good and evil felt more grounded in humanity.

---

So that's my best of for 2017. Got any opinions on these, or know of anything I've missed that I should check out? Let me know!

Keep reading!

Chris


HULK SMASH! is usually the norm, but this week it's more HULK MEH?

Billy joins Christof in grumptown in this episode as they both get a rude reminder of just how bad 2008's The Incredible Hulk really was.

Topics covered include: Edward Norton's greedy acting, terrible CGI, Daddy's home and the whole Hulk penis situation.

As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here


If you want to engage with Billy and Christof more you can do so at the following: 

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/

Christof
Twitter - https://twitter.com/weeklygeek


Our Intro and Outro music provided by bensound.com





A cover-up that spanned four U.S. Presidents pushed the country's first female newspaper publisher and a hard-driving editor to join an unprecedented battle between journalist and government - IMDB

Director: Steven Spielberg
Writers: Liz Hannah & Josh Singer
Starring: Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Bob Odenkirk, Bradley Whitford, Sarah Paulson, Tracy Letts, Bruce Greenwood, Jesse Plemons, David Cross and many more.
In Cinemas: January 11th.

Even though Steven Spielberg’s latest film The Post is set in the 1970s, it carries two important lessons still highly relevant today: protecting the rights of the press, and the importance of gender equality. Despite not being an overly subtle affair, I couldn’t resist the inherent charm of this film.

From a certain corrupt Mayor of Amity Island to the meddling shadowy government figures in Bridge of Spies,; Spielberg has often taken aim at those in power. Yes, they make for easy-cookie-cutter villains. But maybe that’s because many in power have been just that: villains.

The Post chronicles the efforts of both The New York Times and The Washington Post attempting to publish details from an explosive government report compiled at the behest of Robert McNamara. The report reads as a confession of sorts by the government that they knew the Vietnam war was a relatively futile expenditure of military lives, all in a vain attempt for the U.S to save face.


Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks lead a formidable line-up of veteran characters actors. For the most part, the supporting actors easily portray the battle-hardened newsroom warriors, the kind of people you’d expect to see sniffing around for leads.


Meryl Streep delivers a quieter, almost reserved performance than what we’ve grown accustomed to in playing Katherine Graham, publisher of The Washington Post. It’s through Streep's performance that Spielberg delivers his criticism of the blatant sexism of the day. In several scenes he cleverly shoots Streep in a seated position with her male counterparts standing around and over her. There’s a constant air of male dominance over Ms Graham’s thoughts and perceived purpose. This is evident in the way the males loom over her as they speak whenever she’s on screen, until Ms Graham finally asserts herself in a rousing moment. Tom Hanks is doing what he does best; playing the nice guy who doesn’t mind sticking it to the baddies no matter the cost. It’s his lovable nice guy routine we’ve seen many times before, but it works for the material.

Spielberg once again teams up with long-time cinematographer partner Janusz Kaminski, which means we’re treated to oodles of the brightest of bright white light streaming in from every window. The films captures the look and feel of the 70s, without ever feeling too indulgent. I never enjoy it when films go to extravagant lengths to recreate the period.

Thankfully the action is restricted to only a few key locations. The newsroom of The Washington Post was awfully reminiscent of All The President’s Men, which surely influenced the design work on display here. Oh and the score is delivered by some unknown composer by the name of John Williams… need I say more?

Although we’re barely into 2018, The Post is your first must-see-film of the year. It’s a little manipulative and at times schmaltzy, but that’s Spielberg, baby! The guy wears his heart on his sleeves and delivers a film that we need right now. It’s the ultimate antidote to #FakeNews.

If you see The Post and agree or disagree with my take on the film, feel free to sound off in the comments below. Alternatively come over to the Geek of Oz Facebook page for more film content.

8.5/10
- Stu

Feel free to follow me on Twitter or on Letterboxd

I think you'd like The Post if you liked:








Thanks to our awesome friends at SUDIOCANAL, we’re giving you the chance to win 1 of 10 double passes to an advanced screening of Liam Neeson’s latest film, The Commuter. The screening will take place at Event Cinemas on George St, Sydney on Wednesday the 17th of January, 2018. To find out how to enter the giveaway, simply head over  to our Facebook page for more details. 

In this action-packed thriller, Liam Neeson plays Michael, an insurance salesman whose daily commute home quickly becomes anything but routine. After being contacted by a mysterious stranger, Michael is forced to uncover the identity of a hidden passenger on the train before the last stop. As he works against the clock to solve the puzzle, he soon realizes he is unwittingly caught up in a criminal conspiracy. One that carries life and death stakes for himself and his fellow passengers.

The Commuter hits cinemas 18th of January, 2018.




This year I’m trying to change up how I present my reviews. Hopefully they’ll be more along the lines that if you liked X, then you should check out Y. They’ll be lighter on in terms of plot details and I guess more like a consumer report. If this works for you I’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

During the early days of World War II, the fate of Western Europe hangs on the newly-appointed British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who must decide whether to negotiate with Hitler, or fight on against incredible odds.

Director - Joe Wright
Starring - Gary Oldman, Kristin Scott Thomas, Lily James, Ben Mendelsohn & Stephen Dillane
In cinemas - January 11, 2018

After so many transformative performances, I’m starting to forget what Gary Oldman actually looks like. Mr Oldman’s ability to immerse himself into a performance is second to none. So who better to do turn to to capture a new take on Winston Churchill? Joe Wright’s latest film, Darkest Hour seems hell-bent on giving us an historically accurate portrayal of the rotund cigar-chomping booze-guzzling linguistic maestro.

Oldman’s performance is great fun and truly larger than life. Sadly though, the film focuses so much energy on Churchill, the rest of the film somewhat suffered for me. Several characters aren’t given nearly enough enough to do, namely Clemmie (Kristin Scott Thomas) and Elizabeth Layton (Lily James). Two fantastic performers that didn’t seem overly challenged by the material.

I couldn’t say this is a must-see film. It barely does what it says on the box. Unfortunately It’s a little too light and fluffy for what would’ve been an excruciatingly tense point of the World War 2. Not my cup of tea.

Direction - Typical Joe Wright; big and bombastic with a few nice touches
Performances - Oldman is fun, rest of the cast is left relatively underdeveloped
Writing - Little too on the nose for my liking
Cinematography - Some beautifully lit scenes, especially in the war-room sequences
Highpoint- Oldman barking at anyone in earshot and quaffing booze like a sailor.
Lowpoint - Painful sequence during which Churchill converses with the general public on a train 

Overall score - 6.5/10

- Stu 

Darkest Hour might be for you if you liked:


I think you'll have a better time checking these out:






I AM IRON MAN ... and Christof is already regretting agreeing do this podcast.

This week Billy and Christof take a look at 2008's Iron Man, the film that spawned the Marvel Cinematic Universe and brought Robert Downy Jr. back into the limelight. 

Topics covered include: A country in the middle east that looks a lot like Afghanistan but most definitely isn't Afghanistan, sexy flight attendants, computer loading bars and saying goodbye to secret identities. 

As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here


If you want to engage with Billy and Christof more you can do so at the following: 

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/

Christof
Twitter - https://twitter.com/weeklygeek


Our Intro and Outro music provided by bensound.com




Earlier this year I made the foolish claim that President Trump wouldn’t be President by year’s end. To make matters worse, I chose to wager on this preposterous assertion with fellow Geek of Oz crew member Chris. If El Presidente was gone, Chris would have to read and review The Art of the Deal by Trump, and if he wasn’t, I would finally check out Tommy Wiseau’s The Room. Sigh. Damn you Trump! Fair to say this brings to an end my betting career on global politics.

I’d always resisted seeing The Room, for the simple fact that I don’t need to intentionally watch bad films. I never ventured into the “it’s so bad it’s good” realm of the cinematic galaxy. It’s just not for me. Now in fairness to The Room, I attended a special screening at a local cinema, who have been doing it for 4 years. Packed house. I threw the spoons. I yelled at the screen. I endured the horrific performances. Suffered through brain-numbing writing. Nearly threw up at the awkward sex scenes. But ultimately, I didn’t care for it. Not as a film or as an experience.

I particularly didn’t care for how the film handled the character of Lisa (Juliette Danielle) who plays Johnny’s (Tommy Wiseau) fiancee. Given the film basically revolves around her cheating on Johnny with his best friend Mark (Greg Sestero), the film goes on to vilify her, in a way that it feels like it was co-written by a college fraternity. The underlining “bros before hoes” message is troubling. Probably didn’t help that seated a few rows behind me was a group of young guys screaming “Lisa you’re a fucking whore, Lisa you’re a fucking slut” each time she was on screen. Now I know it’s basically pantomime, but I was troubled by the rampant misogyny on display in the crowd.

One of my biggest problems with The Room is that it’s made by someone who can’t write, act or direct. Not exactly a huge surprise that it turned out to be a laughable disaster. Plenty of films don’t work even when they are made by masters of the craft. One young bloke at my screening was presented on stage proudly claiming this to be his 17th screening. I couldn’t help but wonder if he’d seen any of the critically acclaimed films of 2017. I’m not telling people what they should or shouldn’t watch, but I guess I go to the cinema to get a vastly different experience to that which The Room promises.

In Tommy Wiseau’s defence though, he’s achieved something that many people won’t. He made a movie. People like myself spend countless hours watching, debating, complaining, whinging and keyboard warrioring about movies, but we don’t have the guts or determination to go make something to serve up for critical consumption. So there’s that I guess.

Good work Trump, thanks a bunch! Not only will you inevitably lead us to some kind of end-of-world-apocalyptic-nuclear-winter situation, but you made me waste my precious time on this irredeemable cinematic dribble.

If you've seen The Room and agree or disagree with my thoughts, feel free to drop a line in the comments below. 

- Stu













Welcome to Episode Zero of TO INFINITY WAR AND BEYOND the podcast where one super fan (Billy) and one grumpy man child (Christof) watch one Marvel studios movie a week in the lead up to the blockbuster-super-hero-punching-orgy that will be Avengers: Infinity War.

In this very special bonus episode we take a quick look at the Infinity War trailer before we kick things off proper with Episode One on Thursday, January 4th 2018. Topics covered include: Casual Dad Thanos, Captain Ameri-beard and Spidey's new threads.

As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here


If you want to engage with Billy and Christof more you can do so at the following: 

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/

Christof
Twitter - https://twitter.com/weeklygeek


Our Intro and Outro music provided by bensound.com




So here we are, 190 odd films later and 2017 has been put to bed. I’ve had an absolute ball this year. For once, it was nice to say I saw my New Year’s resolutions through to the end. I endeavoured to record my top 10 films of the year at the end of each month and thankfully it’s all over. But that just leaves one important list to present, my top 10 as of the end of December. Sigh. I still hate this moment. In fact, I’ll regret this list for the next 6 months or so, no matter the order or content. For me "best" is simply the films from this year I can't stop thinking about. Most films trickle away shortly after the moment, but luckily each year we're treated to those gems which linger in our hearts and minds many months later. With that I present to you my super-dooper-must-see-extravaganza list of 2017! Not just my final top 10 films of the year, but I've also packed a tonne of other goodies in there too. If you agree or disagree with my list please sound off in the comments below, or come over to our Facebook page to yell at me. 

- Stu


THE BEST: 

1. Land of Mine
2. Lady Bird
3.  Call Me By Your Name
4. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
5. Get Out
6. I am Not Your Negro
7. Blade Runner 2049
8. Good Time
9. Lucky
10. Brigsby Bear

HONOURABLE MENTIONS: 

11. Dunkirk 
12. Moonlight
13 . Loving  
14. Florida Project
15. Killing of a Sacred Deer 
16. Colossal
17. Lady Macbeth
18. A Ghost Story
19. Logan Lucky
20. Baby Driver
21. Trip to Spain
22. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri
23. Edge of Seventeen
24. The Salesman
25. Lost City of Z
26. Graduation
27. It Comes at Night
28. Wind River
29. Happy End
30. 20th Century Women 
31. The Meyerowitz Stories
32. The Bad Batch 
33. Hounds of Love 
34. The Nile Hilton Incident
35. On Body and Soul 


THE WORST:

Fate of the Furious
The Dark Tower
Justice League 
Silence 
Life
The Mummy
50 Shades Darker  


Films I've watched this month:

Only the Brave
Coco
Darkest Hour
The Disaster Artist
Florida Project
Three Billboards outside Ebbing Missouri t
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Films i've watched this year (in the cinema):

1. Passengers
2. Edge of Seventeen
3. Paterson
4. Moonlight
5. Manchester by the Sea
6. Split
7. Jackie
8. XXX: Return of Xander Cage
9. Moonlight
10. Lion
11. Live by Night
12. Perfect Strangers
13. Batman (1966)
14. Rosalie Blum
15. Patriots Day
16. Moana
17. Gold
18. Silence
19. Singing in the Rain (1952)
20. Hidden Figures
21. Fences
22. The Love Witch
23. Toni Erdman
24. Fences
25. The Great Wall
26. Silence
27. David Stratton: A Cinematic Life
28. 50 Shades Darker
29. Miss Sloane
30. Trainspotting 2
31. Logan
32. Kong: Skull Island
33. Beauty and the Beast
34. Get Out
35. The Salesman
36. The Cure For Wellness
37. Monsieur Chocolat
38. The Eagle Huntress
39. Lego Batman
40. Loving
41. Things to Come
42. Farewell, My Queen
43. Power Rangers
44. Land of Mine
45. Life
46. Smurfs: The Lost Village
47. Their Finest
48. Alone in Berlin
49. Ghost in the Shell
50. A Man Called Ove
51. Ghost in the Shell
52. Colossal
53. Zach's Ceremony
54. Chips
55. Lego Batman
56. Boss Baby
57. John Wick: chapter 2
58. Fate of the Furious
59. Denial
60. Going in Style
61. Raw
62. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2
63. The Osiris Child Sci Fi Vol 1
64. Free Fire
65. Get Out
66. The Trip to Spain
67. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2
68. Alien: Covenant
69. King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
70. Get Out
71. John Wick: Chapter 2
72. The Mummy
73. Wonder Woman
74. Baywatch
75. 20th Century Women
76. Hounds of Love
77. Ana, Mon Amour
78. The Ornithologist
79. Waiting for Giraffes
80. The Nile Hilton Incident
81. Whitney: Can I be Me
82. Taste of Cherry
83. My Year with Helen
84. Happy End
85. Ingrid Goes West
86. The Wall
87. The Hidden Fortress
88. Yojimbo
89. Wonder Woman
90. 78/52
91. Ama-San
92. I Am Not Your Negro
93. Mifune: The Last Samurai
94. Graduation
95. Barbecue
96. Abacus: Small Enough to Jail
97. On Body and Soul
98. Kedi
99. Rough Night
100. Call Me By Your Name
101. The Promise
102. Porto
103. God's Own Country
104. It's Not Dark Yet
105. The Little Hours
106. The Farthest
107. The Beguiled
108. All Eyez On Me
109. Okja
110. Transformers: The Last Knight
111. Baby Driver
112. Una
113. The House
114. Spider-Man: Homecoming
115. It Comes at Night
116. Spider-Man: Homecoming
117. Baby Driver
118. Inconvenient Truth: Sequel
119. Dunkirk
120. War for the Planet of the Apes
121. Dunkirk
122. Atomic Blonde
123. The Big Sick
124. Lady Macbeth
125. Kiki, Love to Love
126. Wind River
127. Maudie
128. Logan Lucky
129. Valerian
130. Terminator 2 3D
131. Trip to Spain
132. A Ghost Story
133. The Dark Tower
134. Logan Lucky
135. The Hitman's Bodyguard
136. American Made
137. Killing Grounds
138. The Room
139. Gifted
140. The Lost City of Z
141. IT
142. Girl's Trip
143. American Assassin
144. Final Portrait
145. Blue
146. Mother!
147. Lego: Ninjago
148. Patti Cakes
149. IT
150. Ali's Wedding
151. Kingsman: The Golden Circle
152. Battle of the Sexes
153. Blade Runner
154. Beatriz at Dinner
155. Blade Runner 2049
156. Mountain
157. Heal the Living
158. Girl with all the Gifts
159. Good Time
160. Happy Death Day
161. Three Summers
162. Blade Runner 2049
163. Thor: Ragnarok
164. The Snowman
165. Killing of a Sacred Deer
166. Suburbicon
167. Brigsby Bear
168. Tom of Finland
169. Thor: Ragnarok
170. Professor Marston and the W Woman
171. Murder on the Orient Express
172. Justice League
173. Blade of the Immortal
174. Lady Bird
175. Lucky
176. Murder on the Orient Express
177. Downsizing
178. Justice League
179. Borg McEnroe
180. Breathe
181. Wonder Wheel
182. Only the Brave
183. Coco
184. Darkest Hour
185. The Disaster Artist
186. Florida Project
187. Three Billboards outside Ebbing Missouri t
188. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
189. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
190. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
191. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
192. Star Wars: The Last Jedi


Episode 59! Stu and Billy are back this week to discuss Star Wars VIII: The Last Jedi.

The Last Jedi is the 2nd film in the Star Wars sequel trilogy, following The Force Awakens. After the events of the first film the Resistance prepares to do battle with the First Order again as they make a daring escape from their base.

Meanwhile Rey develops her newly discovered abilities with the guidance of Luke Skywalker, who is unsettled by the strength of her powers.

The film stars Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker), Carrie Fisher (General Leia Organa), Adam Driver (Kylo Ren/Ben Solo), Daisy Ridley (Rey), John Boyega (Finn), Oscar Isaac (Poe Dameron), Andy Serkis (Supreme Leader Snoke), Lupita Nyong'o (Maz Kanata), Domhnall Gleeson (General Hux), Anthony Daniels (C-3PO), Gwendoline Christie (Captain Phasma), Kelly Marie Tran (Rose Tico), Laura Dern (Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo), Benicio del Toro (DJ), and many others.

About halfway through the podcast we dive into a spoiler discussion as well, but we warn ahead before we do that.

As well as the films, Stu and I discuss what else we've been watching this week, and look over the latest in movie news.

As always it would make our day if you could take a couple of minutes to rate and reviews us on iTunes or drop us some feedback below! Really keen to have your input in the show.

Enjoy!





                                      Get it from Whooshkaa here


                                            Get it from Itunes here

If you want to engage with Stu and Billy more you can do so at the following: 
Stu
Twitter - https://twitter.com/stu_watches
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/stucoote/

Billy
Twitter - https://twitter.com/Aqualec
Letterboxd - https://letterboxd.com/aqualec/